login

Search documents

Browse topics

Document details

 
Title:
 
Why Multi-Busbars and Future Emitters Require Further Shrinking of Finger Line Width
 
Author(s):
 
L.J. Koduvelikulathu, J. Lossen, D. Rudolph, M. Matusovsky, G. Dishon
 
Keywords:
 
Simulation, Fine Line Printing, Busbar(s), Grid Optimization, GRIDDLER
 
Topic:
 
Wafer-Based Silicon Solar Cells and Materials Technology
Subtopic: Silicon Solar Cell Characterisation and Modelling
Event: 32nd European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference and Exhibition
Session: 2DO.4.5
 
Pages:
 
550 - 554
ISBN: 3-936338-41-8
Paper DOI: 10.4229/EUPVSEC20162016-2DO.4.5
 
Price:
 
 
0,00 EUR
 
Document(s): paper
 

Abstract/Summary:


Co-development of silver printing pastes, screens with finer meshes, and advanced printing machines, enabled for a steady shrinkage of finger widths. Advancement on glass frits allowed for contacting of lower doped emitters, improving the cell parameters from the better passivation and low Auger recombinations of these advanced emitters. We evaluate in this paper, what the optimum finger line width would be, for cells having high number of busbars and advanced emitters. A grid optimization study is performed on standard reference p-type PERC using GRIDDLER software, varying finger line widths and aspect ratio for the different number of busbars. An optimum finger width is obtained for a given number of busbar and finger aspect ratio, beyond which further smaller finger line widths, the cell efficiency drops due to the large number of fingers required which results in increased optical shading and voltage losses. With advance emitters (high sheet resistance) similar observations are made. In other words, it is advantageous to have fine finger line widths for cells with high number of busbars and advanced emitters. Further, we show using the patented novel Pattern transfer technology (PTPTM) very small finger line widths with good aspect ratio can be achieved. PTPTM is a non-contact printing technology based on laser transfer hence has the potential to overcome the limitations of screen printing technology and increase cell performance in the future.